Humility and Sharing Successes

Humility is a valued teaching among native communities. In my community, we tell stories about plants, animals, and a certain trickster that learned lessons of humility long ago, to help our children grow up humble and to remind us adults to walk a good path in life. With these teachings, reminders are everywhere: a simple walk in the woods, in the territory of beavers who no longer boast about their beautiful tails, reminds me to be humble. But what does this have to do with success stories?

The team here at the National Native Network seeks out successes among Tribes and tribal organizations, to document and share across Tribes and tribal organizations. We are building a collection of tribal success stories as a library of strategies that have worked in tribal communities. These stories focus on the work being done, how challenges were overcome, and highlight improvements in tribal public health. Sometimes, when we approach a tribal program about writing a success story, the initial reaction involves considering whether sharing a success is boasting, as beaver did about his beautiful tail. It is not. It is a humble act to share the good work that you’re doing for others to take, learn from, use, and build upon. Legacies of historical trauma further complicate and inspire our need to share our stories, and are a much needed area of work in tribal public health.

We don’t have a strong evidence base for many public health practices that work in Indian Country. Much of the funding we receive is restricted to evidence based practices that were largely developed by and researched among non-Native populations. We at the National Native Network and numerous other tribal organizations across the continent are working to address this issue and seeking to build an evidence base for tribal best and promising practices. These success stories are humble steps in the right direction.

For more information on tribal best and promising practices, see the Best Practices for Commercial Tobacco Prevention and Control in Indian Country and the National Indian Health Board’s Healthy Indian Country Initiative Best and Promising Practices Resource Guide.

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Upcoming Events

Attending any of these upcoming events? Have other events to share? Let us know! Email us at NNN@ITCMI.ORG to share your event information or to get on our list serve for event updates.

 

WEBINAR -- "BRCA Genetics in The News:  What Do I Do Next?" -- Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 8 p.m. EST. -- The webinar features Sharsheret's own Genetics Program Coordinator, Peggy Cottrell, MS, CGC, who will explore the latest critical genetics research, decode BRCA and other genetic mutations, and help us understand what steps we need to take next.  A Sharsheret peer supporter will share her personal story and a live question and answer session will follow the presentation.  We are proud to partner with FORCE on this presentation!  To register for the webinar or to share the webinar with others in your network, CLICK HERE.  Feel free to share widely.  If you have any questions, please contact Support Program Coordinator Shira Kravitz at skravitz@sharsheret.org or 1-866-474-2774.

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY -- The Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board and the Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center is pleased to announce 2 new funding opportunities in partnership with the Indian Health Service (with funding from the National Institutes of Health) and the Centers for Disease Control. -- The Substance Abuse and Mental Health IHS/NIH Project Sub-Award will be used to support the assessment of and response to the leading public health priorities of substance abuse and/or mental health.  It is anticipated that up to 6 awards will be available for the 2017-2018 funding cycle.  |  Applications are due on December 29, 2017.  |  LEARN MORE HERE

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY - The Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board and the Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center is pleased to announce two new funding opportunities in partnership with the Indian Health Service (with funding from the National Institutes of Health) and the Centers for Disease Control. | The Tribal Public Health Priorities CDC Project Sub-Award will be used in support of and response to local public health priorities and needs as well as contribute to the development of tribal public health workforce and infrastructure.  It is anticipated that up to 12 awards will be available for the 2017-2018 funding cycle.  |  Applications are due on December 29, 2017. | LEARN MORE HERE

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY - Public Health Institute is accepting applications for the National Leadership Academy for the Public's Health from teams in the Appalachian and Mid-regions of the United States.  "For communities that are engaged in cross-sector work to improve the public health, this is an opportunity to boost your team's capacity and skills through a community leadership process."  Deadline January 12, 2018 - LEARN MORE

It's About a Billion Lives Symposium -- February 2, 2018, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. - University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA - SAVE THE DATE - LEARN MORE

Funding Opportunity - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - Policies for Action:  Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health - HERE