Colorectal cancer in American Indians can be prevented through screening and awareness, American Indian Cancer Foundation says

Colorectal cancer in American Indians can be prevented through screening and awareness, American Indian Cancer Foundation says

For Immediate Release
February 29, 2016
Contact: Julia Jacobson, Communications Specialist
612.314.4852 or jjacobson@aicaf.org

BROCHURE

:15 PSA MP3

MINNEAPOLIS – During colorectal cancer awareness month in March, the American Indian Cancer
Foundation (AICAF) encourages people to get screened for colorectal cancer and share information
about colorectal cancer in their communities.

Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in American Indians after lung cancer and
colorectal cancer is 53% higher in Northern Plains American Indians than in non-Hispanic whites. Only
39 percent of people ages 50-75 in Indian Health Service areas have been screened for colon cancer
compared to 59 percent of the overall US population.

“Although colorectal cancer screening rates have been increasing, our communities can do better,”
AICAF community health worker Joy Rivera said. “Colorectal cancer is preventable through screening
and if found early, nine out of ten people survive.”

AICAF urges all people to recognize colorectal cancer awareness month in the following ways:
Wear Blue.

Wear blue to honor colorectal cancer warriors and survivors on Friday, March 4 for Dress in Blue Day,
hosted by the Colon Cancer Alliance. Check out dressinblueday.org for more information.
Learn.

Discover resources on colorectal cancer in American Indians at americanindiancancer.org/colon.
Share.

Tell your friends and family about colorectal cancer. Encourage them to seek screening and to adopt
healthy habits.

Get Screened.
Talk to your health care provider for advice and information on colorectal cancer screenings.

Join our community.
Like the American Indian Cancer Foundation on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and sign up for our
newsletter.

Donate.
Any amount helps the American Indian Cancer Foundation continue to raise colorectal cancer
awareness, increase early detection and build a network for American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

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WEBINAR -- "BRCA Genetics in The News:  What Do I Do Next?" -- Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 8 p.m. EST. -- The webinar features Sharsheret's own Genetics Program Coordinator, Peggy Cottrell, MS, CGC, who will explore the latest critical genetics research, decode BRCA and other genetic mutations, and help us understand what steps we need to take next.  A Sharsheret peer supporter will share her personal story and a live question and answer session will follow the presentation.  We are proud to partner with FORCE on this presentation!  To register for the webinar or to share the webinar with others in your network, CLICK HERE.  Feel free to share widely.  If you have any questions, please contact Support Program Coordinator Shira Kravitz at skravitz@sharsheret.org or 1-866-474-2774.

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY -- The Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board and the Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center is pleased to announce 2 new funding opportunities in partnership with the Indian Health Service (with funding from the National Institutes of Health) and the Centers for Disease Control. -- The Substance Abuse and Mental Health IHS/NIH Project Sub-Award will be used to support the assessment of and response to the leading public health priorities of substance abuse and/or mental health.  It is anticipated that up to 6 awards will be available for the 2017-2018 funding cycle.  |  Applications are due on December 29, 2017.  |  LEARN MORE HERE

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY - The Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board and the Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center is pleased to announce two new funding opportunities in partnership with the Indian Health Service (with funding from the National Institutes of Health) and the Centers for Disease Control. | The Tribal Public Health Priorities CDC Project Sub-Award will be used in support of and response to local public health priorities and needs as well as contribute to the development of tribal public health workforce and infrastructure.  It is anticipated that up to 12 awards will be available for the 2017-2018 funding cycle.  |  Applications are due on December 29, 2017. | LEARN MORE HERE

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY - Public Health Institute is accepting applications for the National Leadership Academy for the Public's Health from teams in the Appalachian and Mid-regions of the United States.  "For communities that are engaged in cross-sector work to improve the public health, this is an opportunity to boost your team's capacity and skills through a community leadership process."  Deadline January 12, 2018 - LEARN MORE

It's About a Billion Lives Symposium -- February 2, 2018, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. - University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA - SAVE THE DATE - LEARN MORE

Funding Opportunity - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - Policies for Action:  Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health - HERE