Lung cancer screening rates remain very low among current and former smokers

Lung cancer screening rates remain very low among current and former smokers

CLICK HERE FOR FULL ARTICLE FROM Medical News Today

Lung cancer screening rates remained very low and unchanged among eligible populations in 2015, despite recommendations that high risk current and former smokers be screened.  The study by American Cancer Society investigators appears in JAMA Oncology.  The authors say it underscores the need to educate clinicians and those at risk about lung cancer screening.

In December 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended annual screening for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) for people ages 55 to 80 with at least 30 pack-year smoking history (calculated by multiplying the number of packs of cigarettes smoked per day by the number of years the person has smoked).  The recommendation came after the National Lung Screening Trail (NLST) showed screening this high risk population could reduce lung cancer mortality 20% in this population.

In 2010, before the recommendation, the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) found only 2% to 4% of high risk smokers received LCDT in the previous year.

To investigate further, researchers led by Ahmedin Jemal DVM, PhD, compared responses from the National Health Interview Survey between 2010 and 2015, including only those who would meet the requirements for screening under the USPSTF recommendation.

The study found the proportion of eligible current and former smokers who reported LCDT screening in the past 12 months remained low and constant between the two years, from 3.3% in 2010 to 3.9% in 2015.  Based on those figures, the authors estimate that of the 6.8 million current and former smokers eligible for screening in 2015, only 262,700 received it.

“The reasons for the low uptake in screening are probably varied, and likely include lack of knowledge among both smokers and doctors as to screening recommendations as well as access to high quality screening,” said Dr. Jemal.  “Our previous study showed implementing quality screening broadly across the U.S. could prevent about 12,000 lung cancer deaths every year in the short term.  But we cannot prevent those deaths until and unless we start educating eligible smokers as well as clinicians about the benefits and risks of screening, so patients can make an informed decision.”

Article: Lung Cancer Screening With Low-Dose Computed Tomography in the United States-2010 to 2015, Ahmedin Jemal, DVM, PhD; Stacey A. Fedewa, MPH, PhD, JAMA Oncology, doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.6416, published online 2 February 2017.

×

Upcoming Events

Attending any of these upcoming events? Have other events to share? Let us know! Email us at NNN@ITCMI.ORG to share your event information or to get on our list serve for event updates.

 

WEBINAR -- Cancer Coalition Identity, Branding, and Marketing -- Presented by American Cancer Society in partnership with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors -- Wednesday, September 20, 2017 3 p.m. EDT -- SAVE THE DATE

Spirit of EAGLES National Conference "Changing Patterns of Cancer in Native Communities" - September 21 - 24, 2017 - Niagra Falls, NY - For more information regarding the conference, visit www.nativeamericanprograms.net or contact Marcy Averill at averill.marcy@mayo.edu.

Tenth AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically UnderservedSeptember 25-28, 2017, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, Georgia - The AACR Cancer Health Disparities conferences advance the understanding and, ultimately, help to eliminate the disparities in cancer that represent a major public health problem in our country. By promoting the exchange of novel ideas and information between a wide range of professionals from academia, industry, government, and the community, these conferences harness the potential and maximize the many opportunities for bringing research on health disparities from bench to bedside or community, and back again. The goals of these conferences have been to bring together scientists and other professionals working in a variety of disciplines to discuss the latest findings in the field and to stimulate the development of new research in cancer health disparities. Make plans now to join us for this exciting program. - Continuing Medical Education Activity AMA PRA Category 1  CreditsTM available

Webinar Series - The National Behavioral Health Network is hosting a series of webinars. - Finding New Financing for Tobacco Cessation & Cancer Prevention Efforts - LEARN MORE