Shape of prostate and compartments within may serve as cancer indicators

Shape of prostate and compartments within may serve as cancer indicators

CLICK HERE FOR FULL ARTICLE FROM Medial News Today

Preliminary computerized imaging reveals the shape of the prostate and a compartment within the gland – called the transitional zone – consistently differ in men with prostate cancer with those without he disease, according to new research led by Case Western Reserve University.

The finding may provide a new avenue to diagnose the disease – perhaps even the cancer’s aggressiveness.

The differences held up in comparisons of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 70 patients.  The scans came from three different medical institutions in Ohio and two in Sydney, Australia, on different makes and models of MRI’s.

The research is published in Scientific Reports.

“Looking at shape is a fundamental shift from looking at the intensity of pixels in an image to predict if a patient has prostate cancer,” said Anant Madabhushi, F. Alex Nason professor II of biomedical engineering and leader of the research.  “Pixel intensities vary, but shape is resilient.”

Variability in MRI scans can result in disagreement as to whether prostate cancer is present, in turn potentially resulting in unnecessary biopsies and treatments.  The American College of Radiology and others are working to develop standards to eliminate inconsistencies in imaging.

“Here, we potentially have an image-based biomarker for prostate cancer, which is not greatly sensitive to the MRI parameters used by each institution, the maker of the MRI or the scanner itself, ” Madabhushi said.

A new view

To find the differences in shapes, the researchers took images of 35 cancerous prostates, aligned them into a single frame and created a statistical shape atlas. They then took images of 35 healthy prostates, aligned them in one frame and created a second statistical shape atlas.

The researchers then aligned the two frames and controlled for size – tumors and a noncancerous condition, called benign prostatic hyperplasia (which some images in this study showed), increase the gland’s volume.

Comparing cancerous and cancer-free prostates showed clear, statistically significant differences in both the shape of the transitional zone – which is in the central part of the gland–and the gland itself.

The researchers analyzed and compared the images from each of the five medical institutions and found that, no matter where the images were from, differences in shapes between cancerous and cancer-free prostates were consistent.

Madabhushi said that if shape proves to be a reliable marker of cancer, it could be combined with radiomics, which employs computer algorithms to extract differentiating features in cancerous and non-cancerous tissues.

Complementing strategy

In a paper published in the December issue of the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Madabhushi and colleagues found they could accurately identify cancer by the microarchitecture and heterogeneity of the tumor in the prostate’s peripheral zone, which is the area surrounding the transitional zone.

The researchers found that aspects of cancerous features in the peripheral zone differed from cancerous features found in the rest of the gland, leading them to identify tumors there.

As with shape, the peripheral zone features held up across the institutions in Tuku, Finland; Sydney, Australia and New York City that contributed MRI scans in this study.

As a follow-up, researchers are now working to identify radiomic features from the peripheral and transitional zones along with measurements derived from the prostate shape to use as predictors of whether a patient has cancer or not.

Further, they are trying to determine whether shape can also predict if the cancer is aggressive or slow-moving–a key in determining how the disease is treated.

Article: Computational imaging reveals shape differences between normal and malignant prostates on MRI, Mirabela Rusu, Andrei S. Purysko, Sadhna Verma, Jonathan Kiechle, Jay Gollamudi, Soumya Ghose, Karin Herrmann, Vikas Gulani, Raj Paspulati, Lee Ponsky, Maret Böhm, Anne-Maree Haynes, Daniel Moses, Ron Shnier, Warick Delprado, James Thompson, Phillip Stricker & Anant Madabhushi, Scientific Reports, doi: 10.1038/srep41261, published online 1 February 2017.

×

Upcoming Events

Attending any of these upcoming events? Have other events to share? Let us know! Email us at NNN@ITCMI.ORG to share your event information or to get on our list serve for event updates.

 

Colorectal Cancer Screening in American Indian & Alaska Native Communities - Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 2 p.m. EST - NCCRT Webinar.  Explore CRC screening in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities.  This webinar will provide a brief overview of the NCCRT and ACS's April 2016 summit on CRC and AI/AN communities to describe ACS's recent grants to increase screening for AI/AN-serving primary care clinics.  We will also hear from two Ai/An-serving organizations that are implementing innovative strategies to increase CRC screening in the communities they serve.  Speakers will include:  Laura Makaroff of ACS, Jessica Deaton of the Oklahoma City Indian Clinic, and Richard Mousseau of the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board.  REGISTER HERE

WEBINAR - 2018 Clinical Scholar Applicants - A Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Program - Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 3:30 p.m. EDT - Do these statements apply to you?:  Are you a health care professional working with kids, adults, or families in a community in the U.S. or U.S. Territories? | Are you motivated to improve the health of those most vulnerable in your community? | Do you have a desire to further develop your leadership skills? | If yes, REGISTER HERE.

Tobacco Listening Session - Kalamazoo, Michigan - LEARN MORE

Community Foods Projects Competitive Grant Program, USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Applications due December 4, 2017 For more information, CLICK HERE

National Institute of Food and Agriculture requests applications for the Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program for fiscal year 2018. The estimated total program funding in fiscal year 2018 is approximately $8,640,000. The Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program funds two types of grants, Community Food Projects and Planning Projects. The primary goals of the Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program are to:

·         Meet the food needs of low-income individuals through food distribution, community outreach to assist in participation in Federally assisted nutrition programs, or improving access to food as part of a comprehensive service;

·         Increase the self-reliance of communities in providing for the food needs of the communities;

·         Promote comprehensive responses to local food access, farm, and nutrition issues; and

·         Meet specific state, local or neighborhood food and agricultural needs including needs relating to: Equipment necessary for the efficient operation of a project; Planning for long-term solutions; or The creation of innovative marketing activities that mutually benefit agricultural producers and low-income consumers.

Eligible applicants include public food program service providers, tribal organizations, or private nonprofit entities, including gleaners.

A webinar will be held on Monday October 16, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time for potential applicants. The Adobe Connect link is: http://nifa-connect.nifa.usda.gov/cfp2018/.

Full details can be found at: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=297333

CDC FUNDING OPPORTUNITY - DEADLINE:  December 11, 2017 - "Cooperative Agreement for Emergency Response:  Public Health Crisis Response" - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a notice of funding opportunity:  Cooperative Agreement for Emergency Response:  Public Health Crisis Response.  The purpose of this opportunity is to "enhance the nation's ability to rapidly respond to public health emergencies, which may include infectious disease outbreaks, pandemics, and other public health emergencies that exceed the capacity of jurisdictional public health resources."  Since initial funding and response can impact health outcomes after an emergency, this award opportunity allows applicants to be pre-approved so they can be funded quickly after an emergency occurs, allowing applicants to better prepare for emergency plans now.  CDC may also fund some pre-award costs.  Tribal governments may apply if they meet eligibility requirements and serve at least 50,000 people through their public health infrastructures.  LEARN MORE HERE.

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY - Public Health Institute is accepting applications for the National Leadership Academy for the Public's Health from teams in the Appalachian and Mid-regions of the United States.  "For communities that are engaged in cross-sector work to improve the public health, this is an opportunity to boost your team's capacity and skills through a community leadership process."  Deadline January 12, 2018 - LEARN MORE

Funding Opportunity - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - Policies for Action:  Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health - HERE