Thirdhand smoke now found detrimental to health

Thirdhand smoke now found detrimental to health

CLICK HERE FOR ORIGINAL ARTICLE from GEN

Exposure to thirdhand smoke leads to biological effects on weight and cell development that could be damaging to one’s health, according to new research led by investigators at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

The scientists found that newborn mice housed with smoke-treated cloths for 3 weeks weighed significantly less than mice in a control group. Moreover, newborn and adult mice exposed to thirdhand smoke led to persistent changes in blood cell counts associated with the immune system for both newborn and adult mice. The blood cell count changes are associated with inflammatory and allergic reactions upon exposure to thirdhand smoke, the researchers said.

Berkeley Lab researchers from the Biological Systems and Engineering Division and the Energy Technologies Area (ETA) teamed up with scientists at the University of California, San Francisco and Nanjing Medical University for the study. The findings (“Early Exposure to Thirdhand Cigarette Smoke Affects Body Mass and the Development of Immunity in Mice”) published in Scientific Reports, suggest that the dangers associated with smoking continue long after the cigarette is snuffed out.

“We suspected that the young are most vulnerable because of their immature immune systems, but we didn’t have a lot of hard evidence to show that before,” said study lead author Bo Hang, M.D., Ph.D., a Berkeley Lab staff scientist who previously found that thirdhand smoke could lead to genetic mutations in human cells. “In this case, we found that thirdhand smoke appeared to inhibit weight gain in neonatal mice, but not in the young adults.”

Notably, the weight effect was temporary. Weeks after smoke exposure stopped, the mice began catching up with their nonexposed peers in weight.

The researchers noted that human babies and toddlers are at greater risk because they come into contact with contaminated surfaces while crawling or teething during a critical window of immune system development.

While the harmful effects of active and secondhand smoking have been well-established by decades of extensive studies, research into thirdhand smoke is still in its nascent stages. But evidence is mounting that the residue lingering on indoor surfaces could be just as harmful, if not more, than secondhand smoke.

Red flags were raised in 2010 when Berkeley Lab studies led by researchers in ETA’s Indoor Environment Group found that nicotine can react with ozone and nitrous acid in the air to create ultrafine organic aerosols and cancer-causing compounds. Subsequent studies led by Dr. Hang, Jian-Hua Mao, Ph.D., and Altaf Sarker, Ph.D., at Berkeley Lab found that thirdhand smoke led to genetic instability in human and mouse cell lines and in mouse models.

The new study goes further by characterizing the biological effects of exposure to thirdhand smoke, an environment created by placing 5-cm2 pieces of smoke-contaminated cotton cloth in the cages with the mice. The researchers focused on changes to body weight and the hematopoietic system after 3 weeks of exposure for two age groups of mice: birth to 3 weeks (neonatal) and 12 to 15 weeks (young adult). They were compared to a control group of mice that were not exposed to smoke.

While the effects on weight were only seen in the neonatal mice, changes in blood cell populations were evident in both age groups. In general, there were lower levels of platelets and specific types of white blood cells in the smoke-exposed mice. For example, neonatal mice exposed to thirdhand smoke had higher levels of eosinophils, female adults had higher levels of neutrophils, male adults had higher levels of basophils, and all mice had higher levels of B cells.

“Those are all types of white blood cells associated with inflammation and allergic reactions,” said Dr. Mao, the current study’s corresponding author. “And the effects on blood cell count persisted even after exposure ended. Changes remained at least 14 weeks after exposure ended for the neonatal group, and two weeks after it ended for the adults.”

The researchers pointed out that they did not study whether the observed biological changes led to specific diseases or other health outcomes, but that other studies suggest links to adverse health effects.

“Thirdhand smoke is an underappreciated risk factor in health,” said study co-author Antoine Snijders, Ph.D. “It’s clear that more and bigger studies are needed, particularly in humans, so we can support policy decisions on thirdhand smoke.”

×

Upcoming Events

Attending any of these upcoming events? Have other events to share? Let us know! Email us at NNN@ITCMI.ORG to share your event information or to get on our list serve for event updates.

 

FREE WEBINAR - Nuestras Voces presents:  Culturally Proficient Strategies to Improve Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Hispanics - March 29, 2017, 2 p.m. EDT - March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month! - Pleas join the Nuestras Voces (Our Voices) National Hispanic Network to Reduce Tobacco-Related and Cancer Health Disparities for our next scheduled webinar.  This webinar is free and open to all, but requires registration. - Among both Hispanic men and women, colorectal cancer is the second-most commonly diagnosed cancer, and the third-leading cause of cancer death.  While screening is a critical prevention tool, screening rates are lowest for Hispanics compared with other groups.  Understanding how to discuss and promote colorectal cancer screening in culturally proficient ways is critical to reducing this disparity.  - During this webinar we will:  1) Learn the results of focus groups with Hispanic adults that informed the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable's (NCCRT) Hispanics/Latinos and Colorectal Cancer Companion Guide for providers.  2) Review ways to address the unique colorectal cancer screening barriers Hispanics can face, as well as strategies to increase understanding and usage of this life saving strategy.  3) Discuss other culturally proficient colorectal cancer materials designed for Hispanics.  - The guest presenter for this webinar is Ricardo Lopez, President of Hispanic Research Inc., and the principal investigator for NCCRT's colorectal cancer focus groups.  Mr. Loopez has studied the U.S. Hispanic market for over 25 years and specializes in health care studies.  Mr. Lopez received both a BS and a BA degree in Marketing and Mass Communications from King's College and an MBA in Marketing Research from Syracuse University.  REGISTER HERE.  Contact pbaker@healthyamericas.org for questions.

CONFERENCE - March 30-April 1, 2017 - SOPHE's 68th Annual Conference - Denver, Colorado - SOPHE takes pride in offering a wide variety of health education and promotion-related presentations.  our speakers come from diverse and exciting backgrounds - we can't wait to learn from them with you!  Take a sneak-peak at this year's sessions. SOPHE hopes you will join us in Denver for sessions like:  A3:  Interdependence Succeeds:  Community Alliances; A6:  Zoom out your Lens:  Cultural Competency in Public Health; B4:  To Do or Not To Do:  Vaccinations; C4:  Delivery Matters:  Factors that Enhance Sexual Education; D4:  Where Does it Stop?  A Look Inside Violence Prevention; E1:  Never Static:  Our Workforce in Flux; F3:  The Virtual is Reality:  Online Health Education ...and much much more!  REGISTER TODAY!  FLIER HERE!

SAVE THE DATE - Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board in partnership with Indian Health Service is proud to offer:  2017 IHS Cancer Support Training - Hilton Garden Inn Uptown, Friday, March 31-Sunday, April 2, 2017, Albuquerque, New Mexico - Interested in starting a Cancer Support Group in your area?  Cancer Support Training is offered free of charge for American Indians wanting to developing cancer survivorship activities or support groups in their communities.  if you have attended in the past, you are not eligible to attend.  Travel scholarships available to a limited number of participants.  For more information see contact information below.  DEADLINE TO APPLY:  March 10 - *Limited number of participants can attend, be sure to get your applications in as early as possible!* - For registration application and more information please contact:  Kendra Roland - kendra.roland@gptchb.org - 605-721-7508 | Roberta Paisano - roberta.paisano@ihs.gov - 301-443-1498 | DOWNLOAD FLIER

The Northern Plains Comprehensive Cancer Control Program and Great Plains Colorectal Cancer Screening Initiative will be hosting the 2017 Cancer Symposium on April 12, 2017 at the Rushmore Plaza Holiday Inn located in Rapid City, SD.  Registration is free, with limited travel scholarships and lodging availability which will be on a first come, first serve basis.  If you live within 90 miles of the meeting site (Rapid City, SD) you will not qualify for a hotel room per Government/GSA policies.  The deadline to register and return the travel scholarship is Friday, March 10, 2017.  Please fax to 605-721-2876 or email deanna.swan@gptchb.org .  Notification for approved travel scholarships will be sent out 2 weeks prior to the meeting date and checks will be distributed at the registration table on April 12.  As the date gets closer an agenda will be sent out.  DOWNLOAD FLIER HERE | DOWNLOAD REGISTRATION FORM HERE | DOWNLOAD TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP FORM HERE

WEBINAR - The Role of Social Determinants in Cancer Prevention and ControlThursday, April 13, 2017, 2 - 3 p.m. EDT - Sponsored by the Health Equity Committee and Michigan Cancer Consortium is pleased to offer this webinar in conjunction with National Minority Cancer Awareness Week - Presented by Haley Thompson, PhD, leader, Populations Studies and Disparities Research Program, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University School of Medicine; Dr. Thompson is also an associate professor in the Department of Oncology - REGISTER HERE

CONFERENCE - April 19-21, 2017 - 2017 Dialogue for Action on Cancer Screening & Prevention - LEARN MORE AND REGISTER HERE

“People sometimes don't remember the things you do – but they always remember the stories you tell.”  — anonymous

 

Are you interested in creating powerful Comprehensive Cancer Control success stories about the important work you do? Stories that people will remember?

 

A five-session Digital Storytelling Workshop is being offered by the American Cancer Society, through a cooperative agreement with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and in partnership with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, a member of the CCC National Partnership. The course is designed to help you create a digital success story for a project or program that you have worked on in the past or are working on presently.

 

Forty-minute sessions will be held every Friday for five weeks, starting April 21.  Between sessions, you will be asked to complete practical homework assignments.  Guidance will be given on every aspect of writing, producing, and disseminating a digital story. 

 

Check your calendar, sign up now, and learn to create memorable messages! Space is limited to the first 15 applicants, and applicants will be accepted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

 

Registration Deadline: April 13, 2017

 

For more information and to register please click the following link: DigitalStorytellingRegistration

 

Questions regarding the workshop can be directed to: CCCNationalPartnership@cancer.org

WEBINAR - Why All the Excitement About Logic Models?  Using Logic Models for Program Planning & Evaluation for Tribal Agencies - Presented by George Washington University Cancer Center - Thursday, April 27, 2017, 2 p.m. EDT - Secure and sustainable funding is crucial for cancer control programming to flourish.  Logic models can help convey to funders "why your program is important, and the logic behind why you expect it to be effective" and successful.  This National Cancer Control Month, we invite past, current and future tribal grantees to our introductory webinar on how to prepare successful grant proposals using logic models.  This webinar is brought to you in response to the evaluation of the American Indian/Alaska Native Cancer Summit in 2016, which found that tribes seek more technical assistance on grant writing and capacity building.  Presenter:  Elton Naswood is a Senior Program Analyst, Capacity Building Division at the Office of Minority Health.  Mr. Naswood is a member of the Navajo Nation and received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology and American Indian Justice Studies from Arizona State University and attended the Graduate degree program in American Indian Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. REGISTER HERE TODAY

CONFERENCE - April 27, 2017 - Protecting Indian Health and Human Services Programs and their Beneficiaries:  The Basics of Health Care and Grants Management Compliance - Crazy Horse Memorial - Crazy Horse, South Dakota - LEARN MORE & REGISTER

Protecting Indian health and Human Services Programs and their Beneficiaries:  The Basics of health Care and Grants Management Compliance - April 27, 2017 - Deadline to register, March 10, 2017 - Learn more and register here.

HNP Flyer final_MPHI EditsHealthy Native People Gathering - April 27-28, 2017 - Great Wolf Lodge, Traverse City, Michigan - Keynote Speakers:  1.  Dr. Tonemah with focus on how trauma is experienced and ways to release it 2.  Laurie DeDecker with focus on energy healing to bring balance to the mind, body, and spirit.  Community Learning Sessions:  Tobacco Teaching, Shawl Making, Opioid Dependence Discussion and more.  Quality Improvement Community Learning.  For more information, contact Madeline Gallegos by email or phone 906-632-6896 x. 108.  VIEW FLIER FOR FULL INFORMATION.

37th Annual Traditional Indian Health Gathering - Chasing Away the Darkness:  Restoring Light to our Sacred Ways - May 19-21, 2017 - Learn More

NATIONAL NATIVE NETWORK WEBINAR SERIES CANCER RISK REDUCTION IN INDIAN COUNTRY:  "Tribal BRFSS Toolkit Presentation" - Tuesday, May 23, 2017, 3 p.m. EDT - Presented by Cathy Edgerly, Program Manager, Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. - LEARN MORE AND REGISTER HERE

SAVE THE DATE - National Indian Health Board:  8th Annual National Tribal Public Health Summit - June 6-8, 2016 - Anchorage, Alaska - Locally Hosted by Alaska Native Health Board - Summit Highlights:  (1) A New Summit Track:  Environmental Health!  (2) Tribal Public Health Accreditation Readiness (3) Health Impact Assessment Training (4) The First Opportunity to Discuss the New Administration's Public Health Policies - More Information Coming Soon

Funding Opportunity - The Patient-Centered Research Institute (PCORI) is seeking Letters of Intent (LOIs) for Tier A projects through their Pipeline to Proposal Awards Initiative.  This program supports the development of research ideas and proposals designed by partnerships of patients, caregivers, and other healthcare stakeholders.  The deadline for submitting a letter of intent is Thursday, April 20.  The purpose of the Pipeline to Proposal (P2P) Awards program is to help people form new collaborations with the goal of developing proposals for research with sound scientific rigor and robust patient engagement.  We are interested in research teams that include patients, caregivers, clinicians, and other healthcare stakeholders, as well as researchers.  KEY INFORMATION:  1. Letter of Intent deadline: April 20, 2017, 2. Application deadline: June 30, 2017, 3. Funding announcement: Pipeline to Proposal Awards Tier A Pre-Engagement/Community Projects, 4. PCORI provides up to $50,000 over the project term, which can last up to 12 months, 5. More about the Pipeline to Proposal Awards Initiative.

CONFERENCE - 2017 CDC National Cancer Conference, Visualizing the Future through Prevention, Innovation, and Communication - August 14-16, 2017 - Crowne Plaza Atlanta Perimeter at Ravinia, 4355 Ashford-Dunwoody Road, Atlanta, Georgia 30346 - The conference theme, "Visualizing the Future Through Prevention, innovation, and Communication," represents the opportunity for translating research into practice to improve public health.  A wide variety of local, state, territorial, federal, academic, national, and community-based cancer prevention and control programs will be represented, creating an excellent opportunity for you to meet partners from around the country.  LEARN MORE

SAVE THE DATE - CDC Conference - August 15-17, 2017 - 2017 National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing, and Media - Atlanta, Georgia - FULL DETAILS HERE.

Spirit of EAGLES National Conference "Changing Patterns of Cancer in Native Communities" - September 21 - 24, 2017 - Niagra Falls, NY - For more information regarding the conference, visit www.nativeamericanprograms.net or contact Marcy Averill at averill.marcy@mayo.edu.