"Multiple approaches are critical to address colorectal cancer screening rates, where joint partnerships are necessary to build momentum across American Indian and Alaska Native communities." -- Kris Rhodes, AICAF CEO

Colorectal Cancer is a Preventable Cancer Across Indian Country

American Indian Cancer Foundation

Contact:  Clinic & Community Health Team
health@aicaf.org | 612-314-4848

MINNEAPOLIS — During colorectal cancer awareness month in March, the American Indian Cancer Foundation (AICAF) encourages people to get screened and share information about colorectal cancer in their communities.

Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in American Indians after lung cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death.  Only 39 percent of people ages 50-75 in Indian Health Service areas have been screened for colon cancer compared to 68 percent of the overall US population noted by American Cancer Society, Inc., Surveillance Research 2017.

AICAF advocates that American Indians should be screened early for colorectal cancer, at age 45 versus 50 years old.  “Multiple approaches are critical to address colorectal cancer screening rates,” says Kris Rhodes, AICAF CEO, “where joint partnerships are necessary to build momentum across American Indian and Alaska Native communities.”

“We continue to develop and expand our partnerships to decrease cancer incidence and mortality in our community through culturally based research, services, education, and outreach,” said Rhodes,” And also access to quality health care, screening, and treatment.”

Be a part of the colorectal cancer awareness movement!

Wear Blue.

Wear blue to honor colorectal cancer warriors and survivors on Friday, March 2 for Dress in Blue Day, hosted by the Colon Cancer Alliance.  Check out dressinblueday.org for more information.

Learn.

Discover resources on colorectal cancer in American Indians at americanindiancancer.org/colon.

Share.

Tell your friends and family about colorectal cancer.  Encourage them to seek screening and to adopt healthy habits.

Get Screened.

Talk to your health care provider for advice and information on colorectal cancer screenings.

Join our community.

Like the American Indian Cancer Foundation on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and sign up for our newsletter.

Donate.

Any amount helps the American Indian Cancer Foundation continue to raise colorectal cancer awareness, increase early detection and build a network for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

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The American Indian Cancer Foundation (AICAF) is a national, Native-governed, 501(c)3 nonprofit health organization dedicated to improving access to prevention, early detection, treatment, and survivor support to eliminate the cancer burdens experienced by American Indian and Alaska Native people.  AICAF partners with tribal and urban organizations to cocreate effective and sustainable cancer solutions that are culturally appropriate.  AICAF believes Native communities possess the wisdom to find innovative solutions that are community centered to address cancer inequities.  AICAF provides capacity building through training, technical assistance, and resources to tribal and urban partners to achieve these shared objectives.  www.aicaf.org

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